My Female Gaming Role Models

My Female Gaming Role Models: Samus Aran

Galactic Federations, Space Pirates, and Mother brains, Oh My!

If you haven’t played any of the Metroid Series, stop reading, fire up that emulator, and go!

Just kidding.

Seriously tho, you should.

I was actually introduced to the Metroid Series a few years ago by Ezrah (my fiance) with Metroid Prime for Gamecube. The mix of sci-fi with puzzles and a “fill in your map” (I absolutely love filling in maps… I could probably play an entire game just about filling maps).

Since I didn’t actually grow up with Samus Aran, I can’t tell you how she inspired me growing up. What I can tell you is how bad ass she is.

Let’s start with the very beginning. A very good place to start….

MetriodNintentoCase  The original box art for Metroid gave no indication as to the gender of the protagonist, or if it even had one. All the box art tells you is that you are purchasing a side scroller monster shooting game. The main character could be a robot. In fact, according to the manual….

MetroidManualpg7

Samus is introduced to us as a male cyborg space hunter. Progressing through the game, the player has absolutely no reason to believe otherwise. There are no specific gender markers that make you question Samus’ gender identity in anyway.

Once you get to the end however, you are given the big reveal…..

MetroidEnding
image cred: gameradar.com

Samus is a female! Above is one of three ending reveals depending on your progression of the game. Now, before we start thinking about the “sexiness” of the costumes, remember one thing: A character being seen as “sexy” does not, and should not, diminish his or her accomplishments. Having “multiple endings”, as multiple as you can get with a Nintendo game, is a business decision on re-playability. She was also the first of her time. Not only was her game the first of its kind, bringing two genres of  video games together in a unique way, she was the one of the first main female protagonist. What the developer’s did was marketing genius.

By showing off her abilities first, by the time you realize she is even female, you have already been through the whole Planet Zebes and saved it. There is no discrediting her capabilities or her motives by changing her gender. With a reveal at the end, you take away all stereotypes about females that could hinder one’s ability to relate to the character. Metroid probably would have not had the success it did, without this revolutionary idea. It may have been dismissed as another great Nintendo game if her gender was male, or may have been dismissed all together if her gender was revealed sooner throughout the plot.

Samus has a lot to be proud of. The Metroid series has sold 16.69 million copies over the years, and was blessed with the title of “the first playable human female character in a mainstream video game” by the Guinness World Records 2013: Gaming Edition.*  As a mascot of Nintendo, her games and her legacy will live on for years to come.

I fell in love with the Metroid series (trust me, there are some gaming series’ I don’t love.) Having played Castlevania, I had the same excitement of filling in the maps, and finding all the loot, while battling monsters and such. As a lot of other people, I loved morph ball. As the gender of a character isn’t really an issue for me, as far as being able to relate to them, Samus being a female was an added bonus, just as Lara Croft, being…well… Lara. As I’ve said before as well, Samus being considered a “sex symbol” (which was not there original intention) in no way takes away from her contributions as a space hunter. To say that sexualizing a female is a bad thing, is weird to me, as long as its not her primary function. (No, I haven’t had the pleasure of playing Lollipop Chainsaw…)

Did you play the original Nintendo Game? What was your reaction to the big gender reveal?

Have you recently been introduced to Samus? What do you think about her as a character, or the games?

Please make sure to check out other installments of My Female Gaming Role Models, and tell your friends!

/bow

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My Female Gaming Role Models

My Female Gaming Role Models: Yuna

“It would be so easy…to let my fate just carry me away…following this same path my whole life through. But I know…I can’t.

What I do, I do…with no regrets.”

In this post, I’m going to talk about inner strength which I believe is just as powerful as physical strength. Yuna from Final Fantasy X is the embodiment of inner strength, resilience, and sacrifice for the greater good. Her journey to save Spira from Sin was emotionally demanding as  well as physically draining for her. I can’t imagine the turmoil she struggled with internally to continue on her path, no matter how it affected her. Not only that, but she tried to never let her inner conflict affect her outer appearance. She took the term “Always look on the bright side of life” to a completely whole new level.

I will admit when I first played Final Fantasy X I was very skeptical to a lot of the new changes that this title brought. Tidus’ voice acting was enough to make me cringe. Trust me, his character I could have done without. I also looked at Lulu and Rikku as the stronger female types, and Yuna as more of your typical white mage type. Oh great another blah female support character, at least Rikku can steal, and Lulu is a black mage. The more I worked through the story, however, the more I came to realize that Yuna was the strongest in the group, with her determination to sacrifice herself for the greater good, and to do it with a smile on her face. She has so much grace and determination it is a wonder she is not also in the discussion of damsels in distress. She herself is a damsel willingly walking into distress with no expectation of any of her male counterparts to save her. In fact, she tried very hard to exempt them from the same path. She was even going to marry Seymour just to help bring peace to Spira! (I hate that guy!)

Her ability to strive to see the good in people, whether or not it actually exists is another trait that I applaud her for. Even with the racism regarding the Al Bhed, and Wakka’s very strong opinion against the “savages”, she knows that they all want the same thing! Her decision to reach across the thresh hold, again for the greater good, adds to her character significantly. I also liked the realism in Wakka’s racism, since he had no idea that Yuna is half Al Bhed herself! (As a half Korean, I completely related to this aspect of her, especially since you wouldn’t be able to tell such a thing just seeing me walking down the street.) Even though religion was her driving force in the beginning, she defied this indoctrination that she had embraced for so long. To realize your beliefs are false, and to gain strength through that realization is a hard thing to do. Any lesser person would have been in shambles. I think religion is something that everybody struggles with at one point or another in their life. Having your entire belief system turned upside down must have been a very rude awakening.

Yuna is proof that you don’t have to be a Damage Dealer to be considered strong, or a strong character, or a strong female character. Her support and love for her friends and her determination to do what is right, no matter what that actually is, her compassion for others; theses are all traits that make her an amazing role model for any female, girl or woman.

What are your experiences with Yuna? Do you consider her a strong female character?

/bow